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Melting Away

A Ten-Year Journey through Our Endangered Polar Regions

Camille Seaman

$55.00

     12.0 × 7.75 in (30.5 × 19.7 cm)
Hardcover
160 pages
200 color illustrations
Publication date: 11/15/2014
Rights: World
ISBN: 9781616892609


For ten years Camille Seaman has documented the rapidly changing landscapes of Earth's polar regions. As an expedition photographer aboard small ships in the Arctic and Antarctic, she has chronicled the accelerating effects of global warming on the jagged face of nearly fifty thousand icebergs. Seaman's unique perspective of the landscape is entwined with her Native American upbringing: she sees no two icebergs as alike; each responds to its environment uniquely, almost as if they were living beings. Through Seaman's lens, each towering chunk of ice, breathtakingly beautiful in layers of smoky gray and turquoise blue, takes on a distinct personality, giving her work the feel of majestic portraiture. Melting Away collects seventy-five of Seaman's most captivating photographs, life affirming images that reveal not only what we have already lost, but more importantly what we still have that is worth fighting to save.
  • Includes short thematic essays and reflections with insight into Camille Seaman s own connection to the region
  • Seaman is a TED Senior Fellow whose 2011 TED Talk has been viewed more than 400,000 times
  • Seaman s photographs have been published in numerous magazines, including National Geographic, the New York Times Magazine, Time, and Newsweek. Her photographs were showcased in a one-person show at Washington D.C.'s National Academy of Sciences in 2008.


Camille Seaman lives in Emeryville, California, and lectures globally about her work and experiences


Editorial Reviews

Library Journal:

"Astounding proof of the critical role the pictorial arts have in awaking people to the consequences of climate change ... .a relief from the shouted rhetoric that so often accompanies conversation on climate change. A sterling addition to all photography collections."

Science magazine:

"Seaman's new book documents the changing polar landscape and the creatures that call these regions home in a series of compelling photographs."

Yahoo! Travel:

"By looking at such rare beauty, we see what we have to lose ... .From brilliant, turquoise-hued icebergs to the wildest of wildlife, her love of the rugged landscape shines through."

Photographer's Forum:

"Camille Seaman gives a visual perspective to the conversation with such tenacity and dedication you can't help but be moved by her images ... .Polar ice is shrinking, and polar animals are struggling to survive. One has to wonder what her next monograph will look like."

Nature magazine:

"Its images alone are a compelling argument for protecting the wonder and strangeness at the ends of the Earth."

Scientific American magazine:

"The steady disappearance of Earth's polar ice is illustrated beautifully, but devastatingly, in this large-format book."

American Photo magazine:

"As monolithic structures carved by light and shadow, the melting polar icebergs Seaman shows us jut out from the landscape, both a showcase of grandeur and a compelling call to action."

North Shore News:

"This collection of breathtaking photographs provides a view of the Polar Regions that make even the icebergs seem alive."

Alaska Dispatch News:

"A spectacular collection of images taken over a 10-year-period ... The photographs in this book are stunning and slowly reveal a world both timeless and rapidly changing."


Reader Comments

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