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University of Toronto

The Campus Guide

Larry Wayne Richards

     6.25 × 10 in (15.9 × 25.4 cm)
Paperback
256 pages
175 color illustrations, 18 b/w illustrations
Publication date: 6/1/2009
Rights: World
ISBN: 9781568987194


Organized as a series of walks through the distinctive precincts of the University of Toronto's three campuses, this architectural guide offers an intimate view of Canada's largest university. Upper Canada's first institute of higher education was originally built in the nineteenth century in a pastoral setting outside the city limits. The downtown St. George campus--deeply embedded in Toronto's dense urban core--serves a community of 70,000 students. One of the highest-ranked universities in the world, it contains some of the finest architecture in Canada, starting with Frederic Cumberland's masterpiece, the Norman Romanesque'style University College (1859). Other buildings of note include W. G. Storm's impressive Romanesque-revival Victoria College building (1892), Darling and Pearson's Gothic-style Trinity College Building (1925), and Hart House, designed by architects Sproatt and Rolph (1919). In recent years, the university has continued to expand with buildings designed by Sir Norman Foster, Behnisch Architects, KPMB Architects, Diamond and Schmitt, and Pritzker prize-winner Morphosis, among many others.


Larry Richards is professor of architecture at the University of Toronto.


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